Cuando ver a un periodoncista

Periodontal treatment may be sought in several ways. Your general dentist or a hygienist may recommend a consultation with a periodontist if they find signs of periodontal disease through the course of a checkup or other dental care appointment. You may also decide to see a periodontist on your own as a referral is not necessary to be seen at our office.

In fact, if you experience any of these symptoms, we encourage you to schedule an appointment at our office without delay:

  • Bleeding while brushing or eating normal foods. Unexplained bleeding while performing regular cleaning or consuming food is the most common sign of a periodontal infection.
  • Bad breath. Ongoing halitosis (bad breath), which continues despite rigorous oral cleaning, can point to periodontitis, gingivitis or the beginnings of a gum infection.
  • Loose teeth and gum recession. Longer-looking and loose-feeling teeth can indicate recession of the gums and/or bone loss as a result of periodontal disease.
  • Related health concerns. Patients with heart disease, diabetes, osteopenia or osteoporosis are often diagnosed with correlating periodontal infections. The bacterial infection can spread through the blood stream, affecting other areas of the body.

Comprehesive periodontal evaluation {CPE}

The Academia Americana de Periodoncia {AAP} recommends an annual comprehesive periodontal evaluation, or CPE, to assess your periodontal health and identify conditions such as periodontal disease that may need additional treatment.

In 2011, the American Academy of Periodontology published the Comprehensive Periodontal Therapy Statement, which recommends that all adults receive an annual comprehensive evaluation of their periodontal health.

A Comprehensive Periodontal Evaluation, or CPE, is a way to assess your periodontal health by examining:

  • Your teeth
  • Your plaque
  • Your gums
  • Your bite
  • Your bone structure
  • Your risk factors

When your dental professional, such as a periodontist, general dentist, or dental hygienist, performs this evaluation, they should look at these six areas to determine the state of your periodontal health.

Why do I need a Comprehensive Periodontal Evaluation?

Recent research has indicated that the prevalence of periodontal disease in the U.S. may be significantly higher than originally estimated. This means that all adults should thoroughly assess the state of their periodontal health to receive accurate information about the health of their mouths.

By assessing your oral health on an annual basis, you and your dental professional will know how healthy your mouth is, and will be better able to notice any conditions, such as periodontal disease, that may need additional treatment.

Research has also shown, and experts agree, that there is an association between periodontal disease and other chronic inflammatory conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory diseases. Por lo tanto, it is very important to treat the inflammation that causes periodontal disease as soon as possible to ensure that your entire body stays healthy.

Your Comprehensive Periodontal Evaluation Checklist

To help you learn more about the state of your oral health, the Academy has developed a Comprehensive Periodontal Evaluation checklist. Download the checklist, print it out, and bring it to your next dental appointment. The steps of the evaluation are listed, and there is space for you to write questions or additional information you would like to share with your dental professional. Check off each step of the evaluation as your dental professional completes your exam, and be sure to ask your dental professional if you have any questions about the evaluation or about your oral health.

El cáncer oral 

The inside of the mouth is normally lined with a special type of skin (mucosa) that is smooth and coral pink in color. Any alteration in this appearance could be a warning sign for a pathological process. The most serious of these is oral cancer. The following are common signs of a pathologic process or cancerous growth:

  • Reddish patches (erythroplasia) or whitish patches (leukoplakia) in the mouth.
  • A sore that fails to heal, and bleeds easily.
  • A lump or thickening on the skin lining the inside of the mouth.
  • Chronic sore throat or hoarseness.
  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing.

These changes can be detected on the lips, cheeks, palate, and gum tissue around the teeth, tongue, face, and/or neck. Pain does not always occur with pathology and, curiously, is not often associated with oral cancer. Sin embargo, any patient with facial and/or oral pain without an obvious cause or reason may also be at risk for oral cancer. We recommend performing an oral cancer self-examination monthly.

Remember that your mouth is one of your body’s most important warning systems. Do not ignore suspicious lumps or sores. Please contact us so we may help.